The big news at Menuez Archive Projects this week is the announcement that Stockland Martel is now our exclusive sales agent in the US and worldwide (apart from Europe– stay tuned for more Euro news soon). They have just sent out the below email blast and we are extremely proud to formalize this arrangement. This deepens our already fruitful relationship as they represent me for assignment work as well. And our clients all know they can expect t us to leap through flaming hoops for them…

If you were at our February launch party or read about us on the blogs, you know our mission is to put the million-plus images from my archive at the fingertips of creatives everywhere. So we’re proud to report that in three short months, we’ve already expanded our inventory well into the thousands, refined our beta site and have thousands more being edited and scanned every month. But now I also understand why more photographers don’t go through this process– it’s seriously difficult and seriously expensive!  But we’ve got a great start and it’s a huge relief to be underway.

May 2010

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Those of you who’ve followed my rants and notes are probably wondering what the heck happened to me these past few months. I didn’t die, but I did kind of break all my rules for survival and for avoiding burnout by attempting an ambitious agenda. We have been working around the clock to launch our new boutique archive stock business, Menuez Archive Projects,  and that is going well despite all the challenges inherent in any new start up. The launch party was a huge success, but we then were faced with more grunt work then expected on the back end. We are on a learning curve and still working through a BETA phase. The good news is that we are now uploading our second batch of gorgeous scans (done by our partner National Geographic) and finishing the retouching and keywording on our third batch which will go up next month. We’ll have close to 7500 high res images online within a few weeks, not bad for six months work. I hope to have a big MAP announcement later this week.

On the assignment front, I’ve been enjoying a long term project that has taken me over the past few months from the Congo to Australia back to NY and last week to the Bahamas, shooting movie stars, scientists, chefs and rock and roll legends and I hope to be able to share that work soon. It’s one of those once in a lifetime dream assignments that is challenging and fulfilling.

And our fearless leader Dave Mendez filed for our non-profit status to start our foundation and production for the “Fearless Genius” project based on my work shot in Silicon Valley. Nothing worth doing is easy however and I think this is still going to be a two year project. Meanwhile, I’m back in NY and returning emails and enjoying our new studio. The “Love” show is still up so please stop by if you are in town to see the prints.

As for “YOUR DAILY MOOD REPORT” on twitter we are working with some software geniuses to update our algorithms. The idea is to gather individual moods from creatives– artists, writers, painters, photographers, art directors– around the world and aggregate one daily mood report, sort of like a weather report for your emotional equilibrium. It’s harder than we thought of course but stay tuned…

More soon!

April 2010


Many thanks to all our friends, families, partners and supporters who all turned out in force for a massive, insane mob scene at our Menuez Archive Projects launch party Thursday. We finished printing the show of my work curated by Karen Mullarkey “Evidence of Love on Planet Earth: Photographs 1978-2010″ at the last minute with help from Innova paper and Duggal Labs and it looked fantastic. With all the work to get to that point, I probably overdid it as I’m still recovering today. Thanks again to everyone who showed up! We’ll post some proper party photos by Whitney Kidder on our MAP page on facebook soon. But here’s a brief iPhone vid from Christopher Beauchamp, our Sales & Marketing Director from his special vantage point of being 10 ft tall:
Screen shot 2010-02-20 at 12.20.17 PM
February 2010

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After the last 48 hrs non-stop without sleep we launched this afternoon with about 2500 images in a BETA site. It’s still under development as we will be rolling out features and adding stories and images from the archive. Any feedback much appreciated. Now for vodka and deep sleep. Happy Valentine’s Day!

You can access through Doug Menuez and selecting STOCK or the site directly:

Menuez Archive Projects

February 2010


I make no apology for the lovefest review to follow. The tools we use make or break us, and I have been working with this digital stuff for a long time, always looking for ways to get back to the comfortable metaphors I grew up with in the wet darkroom and with film. Aperture 3.0 incorporates a lot of that tradition while providing all the latest technology to actually make me more efficient. Yes, they feature me in a nice video of how I use it, and that’s great, but seriously, my motivation for participating in beta testing and marketing is that I am just looking for the best tool to solve my problems. When I find something like Aperture I want it to succeed so I’m pushing hard for people to try it.

In all the years of working with software and hardware I’ve rarely if ever seen such a quantum leap in features in an upgrade. But these are not just features to add marketing punch, these are serious workflow improvements that take a program we love and use on a daily basis to a level pretty damn close to perfection. We asked them to merge libraries, so we could have a main archive in studio and bring the shoots back easily, we asked them for flags and labels, and unlike a lot of companies, Apple listened. And did it. And then they added tons of other cool and useful things such as Faces– face Rrecognition, and Places– geo taging, and more importantly, the shockingly productive new retouching tools. To me, what has been accomplished goes all the way back to some of the precepts Doug Engelbart spoke about in the 1950’s, about computers being able to leverage our brains. Because this is non-modular, I can work in a truly intuitive creative way on several levels as I’m editing and retouching. I can do several things at once throughout the program. This is a dream. You won’t believe it. Amazing. Check it out:

Apple – Aperture – In Action – Doug Menuez

Doug Menuez featured in Apple’s “Aperture in Action” video series « Stockland Martel

February 2010

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After several years of work, Menuez Archive Projects will open on February 14th, followed by a launch party on the 18th at our new studio in West Chelsea. Working virtually non-stop over the last four months since we got partners, we have been editing and vetting my archive of over a million images, and now scanning the selects. We’ll be making these images available to advertising, editorial and educational users through a new web site as well as through my agents at Stockland Martel. And we can now continue the preservation of my historic material shot in Silicon Valley that is housed at Stanford University Libraries.

I’ve been alluding to this upcoming launch and inviting folks to our blow-out party, but now that we’re in the homestretch I feel comfortable myself mentioning it here. MAP is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity and chance to leverage all my years of work, and create a solid new platform to build on for the future phases of my career. The development of this project ties in with all the stuff I teach in my workshops in Santa Fe (March 7-13) and Woodstock (Aug. 7-8) and so I’m actually walking the talk. Not so easy, but what I do feel good about is that I’m proving this merger of art and commerce and getting paid to shoot what you love can be a reality; if I can do it, others can.  I think photographers all have to explore whatever they can in this harsh environment in terms of new business models, but the bottom line will always come back to what you see that no one else does and then supporting that vision with a solid business plan. Or marry well.

The most fun thing of the past few weeks though has been a chance to shoot a whole new library of images in Miami documenting various stories of real life—just as I would on my own—but the beauty part is these are all released.

Here’s a link to more info about our project on Stockland Martel’s blog, if you are interested in joining us for the party:  Party invitation: Come celebrate Menuez Archive Projects on Feb. 18 « Stockland MartelOf course, we are taking large risks, and no new venture is without risk. Over my career, I’ve experienced both successes and failures, and the clearest path to a more satisfying creative life goes straight through risk territory. What the hell, life is short.

Here’s the last shot I made at the end of our week in Miami. Through my talented nephew Max we found an intriguing electronic hip-hop band having a house party. As we were leaving, my young war photog friend Dan McCabe, who was helping out with video, alerted me that some of the kids from the party were hurling beer bottles at the train going through the yard across the street. By the time I got there,  the vibe and attention had shifted to more important matters:

House Party Kiss, Miami, 2010. ©Doug Menuez

House Party Kiss, Miami, 2010. ©Doug Menuez

February 2010

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Doug Menuez
March 7 – March 13, 2010

REGISTER ONLINE » at link below
For more information or to register by phone,
call (505) 983-1400, ext. 11.

My upcoming workshop at the amazing Santa Fe Workshops is still open for sign ups and I welcome anyone who thinks they may benefit to go for it. Times are tough and it’s hard to justify that extra expense when survival is paramount, but I would argue this expense is crucial. The issues we delve deeply into are exactly those required to fine tune your skill set to not only survive, but thrive.

Photography Workshops | Santa Fe Photographic Workshops Santa Fe, New Mexico

From the catalog course description:

Photographers often find it difficult to reconcile the desire to follow one’s passion with the need for financial security. Doug Menuez figured out how to get paid for shooting exactly what he loves to shoot, and he shares the logical steps toward finding your own answers, based on his real-life experience.

Participants return home with a newly defined vision of themselves and their work, and with the tools to create the life in photography they have always wanted to lead. Join us and build a better foundation for your future.

January 2010

DENNIS STOCK 1928-2010.

Dennis Stock & Susan Richards after exchanging wedding vows in 2006.

Dennis Stock & Susan Richards after exchanging wedding vows in 2006 at their house in Woodstock, NY. ©2010 Doug Menuez.

Dennis Stock has died at the age of 81. He began his long career at Magnum in 1951 shortly after winning first prize in the LIFE Magazine young photographers contest. Widely known for his intimate portraits and coverage of James Dean, Dennis covered a wide range of stories for all the major magazines,  publishing at least 16 books. He was always finding the heart of the subject matter and making compelling, beautifully composed photographs that everyone of my generation grew up remembering. He was a living link to what he often called a “golden” age of photography and an inspiration to me and countless others.

Dennis made pictures that get into your head and never leave. Simple moments that articulate a whole culture. His work in jazz and covering the hippie movement are great examples. He did this with passion and grace and with an open mind and heart. This was a man who lived and breathed photography and exemplified the life well lived.

He was also a dear friend and mentor and his gift to me was a constant vigilance and questioning of what I was doing or planned to do. He helped me immensely at a time when I was at a crossroads with very generous advice. He sometimes had a harsh style and could be intimidating, but that was because of his tremendous passion and belief in his ideas. He was old school, and unwilling to tolerate the least amount of bullshit from anyone. But he had a heart of gold and cared deeply about people, the world in which he lived, and his friends and family.

In my last conversation with Dennis a few days before he died he had just been diagnosed with inoperable cancer and given two months to live. Yet it was not really a sad conversation and we made plans to visit this weekend. He was too fierce to give up and I certainly could not accept the diagnosis as any kind of reality. But it was definitely the gentlest, easiest conversations we’ve had. Usually we debated the many issues we disagreed on. We even debated the ones we agreed on actually. But in this conversation he talked lovingly of his dear wife, the bestselling author and memoirist Susan Richards, who met and married Dennis three years ago. She brought him immeasurable happiness and balance at the very end of his long life, a blessing. He spoke of his “brilliant” son and grandson and their families. He was immensely proud of his offspring and described their considerable and impressive accomplishments. We talked about his years with Magnum, about his mentors and inspirations, his longtime colleagues he admired such as Elliott Erwitt, and his battles and frustrations.

An example of the kind of thing we would talk about a lot was compostion.  During our last talk, without any sense of bragging or ego, Dennis said, “for whatever reason, I was given the ability to frame anything. I can make a great composition instinctively.” He was stating a fact. Just look at his pictures. He also deeply believed in the precepts of HCB in regard to it not being enough to capture the moment, you had to also frame that within a pleasing geometric composition. For Dennis, this is how you catch the eye of the viewer, and this is how you make your pictures memorable.

We talked about his early days and I asked him about Eugene Smith. He told a few Smith anecdotes and the story about how Smith hired and fired him and sent him to Gjon Mili. We got on to the subject of the uncanny portrait taken by Andreas Feininger that graced the cover of LIFE after Dennis won the award in 1951. Dennis mentioned that a few years back one of his workshop students came to him and asked if he could recreate that portrait of Dennis. Although Dennis was a skeptical of the idea he consented and was quite amused and happy with the result in that he had this sort of bookend set of portraits at the beginning and near end of his life.

We once had a show at our former Woodstock Gallery of his Hollywood work, which was a rare and crazy priviledge. In general, except as I said for this last conversation, Dennis kicked my ass almost every time we spoke– constantly, urgently talking to me about what I was doing, or what he thought I should be doing, with my work and my life. That was a gift I can never repay. I was truly lucky to meet him and have him in my life, even briefly.

Dennis was the real deal. He will be sorely missed.

January 2010

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Several friends and family have asked so finally for those interested here’s a link to my recent talk I gave at the amazing TEDX San Francisco on my upcoming project “FEARLESS GENIUS.”

FEARLESS GENIUS is a film and book documenting the leading innovators in Silicon Valley during the 1980’s and 1990’s. The work began with a LIFE Magazine assignment from Picture Editor Peter Howe to cover Steve Jobs building the NeXT computer and continued for 15 years, ending with the collapse of the dot com era. Now housed at Stanford Library, it is being edited by Karen Mullarkey, former picture editor of Newsweek, Sports Illustrated, Rolling Stone, and with Brian Storm of MediaStorm who is producing the feature length documentary film and multimedia piece. We are launching a new non-profit for education, Backlight Media Group, to make this project a catalyst and inspiration for the next generation of engineers.

I’m especially grateful to the organizers for having me join such an esteemed group of speakers, I was inspired and awed. You can see and learn more about TEDX here: TEDxSF

December 2009

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©2009 Doug Menuez.

©2009 Doug Menuez.

New Yorker’s always find the upside in any situation. Yeah, tough, but kinda optimistic too. Wishing you lots of NY attitude this holiday season.

December 2009

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