Something to SAY

Legendary creative director John Doyle recently asked me to make portraits of kids who are working to overcome severe stuttering problems with the help of a nonprofit organization called Our Time, which John is rebranding as SAY: The Stuttering Association for the Young. I have an old friend who built a career as a top photojournalist despite a severe stuttering problem. From him I learned a lot about the challenges people who suffer from this disability go through and was so impressed by how he overcame his problem to succeed. Shooting kids is always a tough job. Even as a parent and someone who has always shot kids, I know from experience you can’t push things or try to control things too much. You have to be patient and open to the kid’s frame of mind, and try to connect. Essentially, you are a passenger on their train.

John said he needed a lot of portraits, all in one day to save money as the project was pro bono. In this case, we were talking about young kids but also teens. Which raises a whole host of other issues around self-esteem, identity, and general discomfort with self-image that are just part of the package of growing up. Add in a disability like stuttering, and I knew it might be tough to deliver the portraits I envisioned.

I wanted to connect emotionally with the kids and try to show their sense of pride and accomplishment for what they were overcoming. It was an exciting opportunity. John and I talked at first about photographing to seven or eight kids, then maybe 12 or more. I thought on the outside we could get to 15.

Then he asked if I could shoot 20 kids—in one day. Hey, I’m game for anything. But to connect with these kids and shoot a range of images in the time allotted with a limited crew and budget (the crew was paid) was a daunting thought, to put it mildly.

Then came the shoot day––big surprise: The kids came in and rocked the house. They burst into dance, they sang, they talked and talked. We had a blast! It was such a gift to meet them and be part of their world. And we got the 20 kids done, barely, as the natural window light faded and our studio time ran out. It seems the Our Time/Say program is working wonders with these bright kids. And I just got a lovely note from John thanking us and saying how happy everyone was with the pictures. It’s a project I’m extremely proud to have been part of.

Sunday
09
March 2014

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NEVER SHOOT KIDS OR ANIMALS

HA! Why can’t I get that simple, age-old rule from ancient photo wisdom figured out? Because kids are endlessly fascinating. And unpredictable. And chaotic. And that’s good fun. I also think I’m attracted to shooting kids because I grew up so fast and am now starting slowly to regress to a second childhood. At least that’s a goal. And although I’ve shot kids all over the world in various cultures, becoming a parent really gave me a heightened awareness of the curious child mindset. I love to try to imagine what they are imagining. But today we are launching a special edit called “CHILDHOOD” on Menuez Archive Projects and featuring a tight edit from our archive of some favorite shots of children. You can read about it on the Stockland Martel blog here and see it by clicking the link or image below.

Doug Menuez on photographing kids (hint: Forget about being the boss) « Stockland Martel

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©2010 Doug Menuez/ Menuez Archive Projects

Wednesday
22
September 2010

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