MY “FEARLESS GENIUS” PROJECT IN MOSCOW PHOTOBIENALE!

Multimedia Art Museum, Moscow | Exhibitions | FEARLESS GENIUS: THE DIGITAL REVOLUTION IN SILICON VALLEY 1985-2000

 

I’m thrilled to announce the world premier exhibition of my project “FEARLESS GENIUS: THE DIGITAL REVOLUTION 1985-2000” which is opening at the Moscow Photobiennale, March 29th, at the Central Exhibition Hall on Red Square. In addition, I’m giving a lecture on the 31st on my work documenting the digital revolution at Skolkovo Innovation Centre and Institute of Science and Technology. This is a project I’ve been working on for decades, which all began when Steve Jobs let me shadow him for three years, and includes a documentary film, app, book and educational program.

This show was a fantastic surprise and came at just the right moment. I have to thank Olga Sviblova, director of MAMM, for choosing this material, and Jean Jacques Naudet for his championing it on La Lettre de la Photographie .

I’ve been working for a few years to edit and scan the work which has been insanely difficult because I shot so much stuff. 250,000 negs were counted by the master picture editor Karen Mullarkey who has been working on this since 2004 when Stanford University Libraries acquired the archive. If you’re in Moscow then please come to both.

Monday
12
March 2012

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COPYRIGHT IS NOT DEAD… yet.

Robert Levine has written a surprisingly readable, fascinating deconstruction of the rapid breakdown of the music and entertainment industry business model that began in the late 90’s and continues. “Free Ride: How the Internet is Destroying the Culture Business and How the Culture Business can Fight Back” is a sign of life for copyright as thinking people are sorting out how to save it. He details how the rapid rise of piracy as the internet grew, along with downloading and file sharing of music and videos, killed a muilti-billion dollar industry and taught a generation that stealing was ok. He does not cover photography, but our world and methods of earning a living from the sweat of our labor, also was devastated by the fantastic and wonderful new digital technologies. Russell Brown of Adobe once said about Photoshop in the beginning that it would not kill photography, it would simply be a new tool. With a hammer you can build a house or tear it down, he said. And I agree. The tearing down phase of our happy world has gone on mostly unabated by young happy consumers of free everything. The bad karma Steve Job’s predicted for these youngster’s naive theft may be that there are no jobs waiting as they graduate with their photography degrees. It’s time to start rebuilding.

Understanding what happened is part of the process of rectifying the situation. I recommend this book highly to all photographers. I’m hoping he’ll add an addendum about photography in the next edition.

Article in Businessweek about Google’s anti-copyright lobbying –
Saturday
29
October 2011

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A SABEDORIA DO BRASIL: A work in progress

I’m just back from Brazil where I’m continuing work on a project that seeks to find the roots of a vast culture at a time of massive change. Check out some of the images below. These are just a few from a small segment of the project about the Jangadeiros of the Northeast, traditional fisherman who risk their lives everyday in simple boats. I expect this to track over a few years and will post new material as time allows.

A Sabedoria do Brasil project traces a visitor’s journey (me) through a vast country with a singular mission: to gather the favorite proverbs, idiomatic sayings and stories of diverse people from all walks of life in every region. These sayings and proverbs, while sometimes trite, often provide real comfort and meaning while revealing the hidden roots and collective wisdom of the Brazilian psyche. It’s a simple idea that yields a fresh way to look at the culture.

Brazil is on fire with change. Beaches, Samba, Carnival and fútbol, although still fundamentally part of the culture, are moving into a supporting role as business is booming. Just as the country declared energy independence they found one of the world’s largest reserves of oil. The Olympics and World Cup are coming and real estate is off the hook expensive. The economy grew at something like 7.5% last year and although down closer to 5% this year is still smoking the US and Europe. The world is watching as the previously tagged “country of tomorrow” is fast becoming the country of today. Although the infrastructure remains challenging, crime and poverty are still massive problems, there is a new expanding middle class and lots of manufacturing, technology, financial and business jobs.  Brazil’s first female president recently took office and is continuing the trade practices of her predecessor.

Yet traditions remain, as you can see in these images of the fisherman of Flecheiras, Ceará. Orson Welles began a film about them in the early 1940’s that was never finished. The cinematography was stunning, and I took that as a good enough inspiration to make the trek up there to meet and visit. One older man told us a story about his grandfather out to sea and trying to drown a cat they discovered on board eating their bait. They pulled up the line later and were shocked to discover the cat tangled in their line, but amazingly grasping dozens of fish in its claws and teeth. Shocked but happy, they kept the cat going at this and came back with double their usual catch. As I listened at first I completely accepted this story as I’ve seen a lot of mysterious stuff in Brazil at this point. But then as I questioned the fisherman he then said that he heard this from his grandfather as the god’s truth.

And then his grandfather told him: “O pescador  não mente; ele aumenta, mas não inventa.”   “The fisherman doesn’t lie–he might embellish, but doesn’t invent.”

Thursday
06
October 2011

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SLANDER, STUPIDITY & THE MINDLESS MOB ATTACKS ON JAY MAISEL

The following is my personal opinion. This post has been updated to reflect new information.

There’s always that terrifying moment when a large, seemingly peaceful gathering turns brutally ugly. In an instant, blood is drawn and you could easily be crushed by the swirling, pulsing chaos of what is now a mindless, violent mob. Sadly, we all know that inexplicable self-destructive stupidity is not limited to the streets, but can be witnessed quite often online. And it’s happening now, in an ignorant, misguided and ruthless attack on Jay Maisel.

The attacks were a reaction by the supporters of former Kickstarter board member and CTO Andy Baio after he posted his recent blog Kind of Screwed – Waxy.org giving his sad spin to the story of how he appropriated one of Jay’s most famous pictures, Miles Davis on the cover of the seminal album “Kind of Blue,” without permission for his own project called “Kind of Bloop,” got sued and settled for $32,000. Andy claimed it was Fair Use and fails to mention the fact that he was selling the album he created, and still is, through PayPal which is clearly a commercial use. Not exactly fair. And the image is clearly recognizable as Jay’s. This is the comparison as shown on Andy’s and other blogs:

Given that Andy describes in his post how confusing the murky mess of Fair Use with its contradictory precedents is, and how unfair this is to those who might get sued, it’s surprising he decided to risk getting sued and not ask permission. Even more surprising is that Andy did in fact call Jay’s studio to inquire about the image after he posted it in May of 2009. Jay’s studio manager at the time was unaware that Andy had already used the image and asked what he’d like to use it for and to send an email with details. Was it personal, commercial, did he want a fine art print for his wall or..? Andy responded that he was just interested in the picture. when asked again, he was vague. He said he just wanted to see it and would like to buy a print someday. He never called or emailed back. And then continued using the picture, fully aware that there might be usage rights to pay for a commercial use.

He also fails to mention that he used the project and Jay’s picture while generating tons of worldwide publicity for his project and Kickstarter, getting web sites worldwide, TV time and exposure on cable news, nightly news, print media and, all using Jay’s picture. The latter usage is important as Kickstarter gets 5% of all donations to projects on Kickstarter. To me it looks like a rather large grass roots ad campaign in support of a start-up company which as it grows stands to make millions of dollars for the founders, for Andy, either directly or a future exit. Then when you find out that Andy has a habit of using other artist’s work without permission––The Beatles, Bill Cosby–– and bragging about it on his blog you kind of start to smell a very clever, social media manipulating… you fill in the blank.

A key question Andy so far won’t answer is why he paid for the rights to use the music and not the photography for his project. This again to me looks like a calculation that it would be cheaper to defend against a photographer then the music label, since his past history indicates he has no respect in general for copyright. But it does look like a lack of respect for photographers in general, which is typical of all those needing our content. In the current economy photographers are really struggling so they look like easy prey.

There is one very interesting attacker who publicly admits to hiring someone to vandalize Jay’s building on his very incendiary and completely uninformed blog here: Breaking: Millionaire Extorts $$$ From Artist, Street Artists Strike Back It is interesting that since they can’t really criticize Jay for protecting his copyright they try to attack him for being successful.

What’s really crazy about this last blogger’s headline is that, A. Andy himself admits he is not an artist as he hired an artist to do the pixelization work, and B. Andy is worth millions and millions due to the sale of his start up Upcoming.com to Yahoo in 2005. How does any of this make sense?

Facebook actually took Jay’s page down after it was deluged with vicious comments such as “hope you get colon cancer and die” and worse. Sickening and shameful. Makes you want to just move out to the wilderness and get off the grid.

Jay doesn’t need me to defend him, he’s led the master class for us all in how to fight for our rights. Nevertheless, it’s appalling to see such uneducated vitriol directed at one of my heroes. It is just crazy to me that someone would even think of infringing on Jay’s seminal image of one of the greatest jazz musicians of the 20th Century; a photograph that contributed to the iconography of Miles Davis and forever defined our visual memory of Davis’s masterpiece album Kind of Blue. Jay Maisel is one of our living treasures, a master photographer and pioneer. He has worked his ass off to get where he is today, and contributed more good will, more inspiration and joy through his trail-blazing photography, generous spirit and years of teaching, and beauty to our culture then can be measured over his stunning sixty-year career. Those who are casting aspersions and criticising Jay reveal a serious ignorance of the US Constitution, copyright law and the rights of artist’s to control their own work. Are you guys advocating rewriting the Constitution? Really?

I have nothing against photographers who use photography as a hobby and want to give their images away. They have income from their day jobs. But don’t try to take away my rights and how we make a living. Why would you want to tear down the professional community anyway? All of us share our expertise with up and coming and hobbyist photogs in workshops and give images to students, researchers, non profits and generally give back to the communty. It just makes no sense to me.

Because a lot of people grew up downloading, i.e., stealing, images and music part of the problem is we have a generation of who expect to get images for free and don’t really understand how copyright could in fact help them make a living. Another factor here is certainly the false class warfare angle.

Take a moment and imagine what it must be like to actually make a living from your photography. Or from any of the arts ––dance, painting, writing, music. I don’t mean posting pictures on Flickr and getting 50 bucks here and there when you are not out skateboarding, or playing in a band for another 30 bucks here and there, or whatever odd job you do to keep going when you are not borrowing money from your mom. Ouch sorry. I mean, imagine you spent years perfecting your craft and got so good at it through intense, hard work, year in and out, that you actually are able pay your bills and support your family. You actually buy food, clothing, and pay a mortgage through the value of your photographs. Imagine the responsiblity of providing for your family from your work, your photography, and competing with thousands upon thousands of other hungry photographers. Now imagine that every content user on the planet would really like to get your work for free if they could, to steal it and use it for commercial gain for as little money as possible. It is a constant battle to survive. It’s just hard to do, if not nearly impossible. You just can’t imagine how hard it really is unless you have done it. And once you’ve gone through the hell of making it, you will fight tooth and nail to protect what you’ve earned.

I’m sorry andy Baio felt he could act without the basic respectful act of reaching out to Jay without subterfuge. And from reading his blog, I get the feeling he’d be a great guy to have a beer with, smart and funny. He clearly knows what he is doing in social media and how to build value into a start-up. He professes a lot of noble ideals. Yet he pushes this agenda that maligns and abuses an artist of the first rank. He clearly values the intellectual property he himself has created and sold. Why be a hypocrite now? Disconnect.

These attacks on Jay Maisel by Andy Baio and his supporters are unfounded and reflect the ignorance in the truest sense of the uneducated, mindless mob mentality at play.

For such smart guys, this whole thing is kind of…stupid.

Sunday
10
July 2011

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RON DAWSON SHOOTS ME

Ron Dawson is on fire, with so many projects and ideas he makes me look like a stoned tortoise, sitting on a rock in the blazing sun. He has so much energy and talent that I find him enormously inspiring. I met over the phone with Ron first when he had me on his fantastic interview program F Stop Beyond. Later he and his equally talented and energetic wife Tasra came to NYC to help me with a project I’m working on, and then they filmed me for this piece which you can see on his site below. I did not realize until I saw this he’d borrowed a lens from my lovely neighbor in the studio next to mine-  Jason Groupp -small world. The best part for me was getting out my old harps- an early passion from my days in the blues band. It was the height of disco in NYC and that’s a long other story. I’m practicing again now, who knows, maybe getting the band back together 🙂

Menuez on Manhattan – Act 1: The City on Vimeo

Read Ron’s blog about it here:

Menuez on Manhattan – Adventures in Filming with an 85mm Lens « Blade Ronner: The Personal Blog of Ron Dawson

Filmaker, marketing consultant, author, interviewer, teacher, social media expert: Here’s some of Ron’s many world’s he inhabits in cyberspace, check it all out:

Ron Dawson « F-Stop Beyond: THE EXPERIENCE

Dare Dreamer Media | Atlanta and Silicon Valley Video Production | Specializing in non-profit, inspirational and cause-driven films.

Wednesday
23
February 2011

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GEORGE OLSON: A VERY FUNNY MAN

I first met George Olson during a sniper attack in San Francisco in the late 70’s. A deranged gunman, reportedly with an M16, was firing from a high floor of an office building down onto the increasingly concerned rush hour population of citizens who happened to be on foot on the streets and sidewalks around the office building. George was clearly a professional news photographer, a photojournalist, with at least three cameras around his shoulders and a Domke bag and a serious yet studied expression betraying the slightest hint of weary jaundice… he’d seen it before… I was thrilled to see him as I imagined that I might be like him someday and be able to leave my miserable job washing cars at the Lincoln Mercury dealearship around the corner.

Since I only could afford the single wide angle lens I remember turning away from the rifle shots above to photograph the pinned down pedestrians pushed up against the wall where George was standing. His dry humor was evident from the start. He deadpanned that I might prefer to get my ass out of the street and have my back safely to the wall with my eyes looking up.

Humor is probably the hardest thing to photograph. And it’s often said luck favors the photographer who is prepared. But luck does not explain the many, many very funny images this man has accumulated. Here’s a few:

Humor is a personal thing so obviously this is my opinion, but it is just uncanny what he’s done. Sort of irritating actually because it’s just not explainable. I mean I walk the streets all the time, and if I get one image a year that is even mildly amusing I’m grateful. I think you’d have to spend almost all your time each and every day cruising for this kind of thing with an amazing antenna up for the set up– the sign that sets up the joke–and the action he’s captured. And then you’d have to be psychic because otherwise you could not possibly anticipate that someone or something was about to happen that would illustrate the opposite of what the sign intended, thus making the punchline. I mean I just don’t get it. It’s way beyond the decisive moment. I can’t even begin to explain it. And so I won’t, but I will recommend taking a look at these images here and more at George’s site: georgeolsonphotography.com
and from his recent show at the iWitness Gallery in Portland, Oregon, here: http://www.pnwcp.com/iwitnessgallery/galleries/George_Olson/George_Olson.html

Thursday
03
February 2011

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NO COPYRIGHT = THE BORG.

COPYRIGHT RANT No. 2

The photography universe is facing a number of threats on a scale I’ve not seen in my lifetime. When I began, there were relatively few photographers. Now with digital, everyone is a shooter, and schools are graduating thousands yearly, all hoping for a life in photography. Competition is beyond fierce.

Statistically 1 in every 500 graduating photography majors will make it.

The biggest threat remains the gradual demise of copyright and our ability to license our images. Since the US Constitution gave creators the power of copyright, culture has flourished as artists have been able to feed their families while creating, books, paintings, photography, etc. A creative life was sustainable. The system worked beautifully for two centuries and everyone in society benefited.

With the advent of digital technology, and the past two decade-long corporate push to crush photographer’s copyright trade practices, the model is broken and will surely die soon, unless photographers unify and fight back. That’s as likely as herding the proverbial cats…. still it’s a shocking thing to see photographers slitting their own throats. That’s partly due to ignorance and fear—young shooters are not taught the value of copyright and existing trade practices and say yes to whatever terms they are offered just to break in—and older shooters say yes to bad terms out of very real need not to starve to death. I get it. And clearly the music industry was first, while film and photography is getting hit now.

SO WHAT IS THE NEW MODEL? HOW DO PHOTOGRAPHER’S MAKE A LIVING?

I ask everyone I meet this question and have yet to get an answer that makes any sense in the last year or so. Creating apps is cool, and being a consultant is cool, and those things might even get you some money. But they are not photography. These activities are not rewarding you directly for a photograph you created.

Commercial photography is broken and will not sustain the number of people trying to get in. The days of getting paid 15K per ad for even a new shooter are over. Everyone is working for less and agreeing to give up their rights without being paid for them just to keep working. Clients care nothing for quality, only the lowest price of a triple bid.

Editorial photography is broken and also is overwhelmed with young shooters and the already jam packed older mob of experienced shooters. There are just not enough outlets for all the work with the massive decline of newspapers and magazines, and they are paying less and less and rights are also a big issue with online and overseas.

Fine Art is actually doing pretty well. Here, the model holds. Artists get paid for their photographs as they always have. This area is also inundated with young hopefuls so the competition for this area is a fierce as the others but the model is holding. No gallery is giving away pictures yet as far as I know. So here’s some good news at least

CHAOS: So we have a perfect storm now with the confluence of these factors: gazillions of hungry, young shooters lacking basic business skills or awareness of how copyright could help them; the economic downturn and necessity of corporations to cut costs, along with their two decade push to crush copyright; and the advocacy of many leading digerati pushing a line about the brave new world that demands artists give up their rights and share their work freely.

First, the young and innocent: a generation has grown up downloading music and images and content for free. They feel entitled to this free content, it’s how they were raised. Many who now want to be photographers probably had one or both parents involved in the arts. Some of them probably grew up in houses paid for by the copyrighted content their parents created. Now that these kids want to make a living in photography they don’t realize the connection between say, not accepting a buy out, or accepting a fee well below accepted trade practice, and their long term ability to earn a living. I had the benefit of my elders, Jay Maisel, Greg Heisler, Elliott Erwitt and many others, strongly impressing on me the incredible power of owning my work and licensing it over and over could have. I paid for houses, put my kid through private school and sustained my personal projects through this simple privilege granted by the founding fathers. Why would I give it up?

The economic reality of running a photography studio is such that the fees you earn typically end up just barely covering your overhead. The nature of cash flow is such that by the time you get paid for a given job you need to pay old bills so that income disappears quickly. Hard to pull out profit. But when  check comes in for re-use and additional licensing, hey, it’s easy to sock that away. The real profit comes from whatever mark-ups can be found, but mostly from re-use. It has been extraordinary. And now almost every job comes with a request to hand over all rights with 0 compensation. They usually say they are sorry but they have some kid in Ohio willing to give up all rights without payment. You can’t compete with that. But at the same time that kid is getting a job that pays once, gets him through the month, but ultimately that model is unsustainable over the long term. Trust me.

As for the economic downturn, it is very understandable that this has impacted corporations and they need to cut costs. But it’s hard to accept knowing that most company profits are actually up right now and they are sitting on piles of cash. Something is rotten in the system for sure. But going back to the early 90’s, it was suggested by Bill Gates at the TED Conference to 500 CE0’s and execs of the leading technology, entertainment, and design companies (hence the name TED), that in the future no one should ever pay more than 50 bucks for a photo. Well that dream sure is coming true. I don’t underestimate the power of Bill’s words to influence corporate America. And until very recently, most corporations resisted that statement because they understood that the value of the quality of the images was intrinsic to the success of their marketing. They needed quality and were willing to pay for it. Thus they respected the existing trade practices. That has faded fast and most corporations now are pushing their ad agencies and design firms to request buyouts, without compensation, as a requirement for their work. Of course this makes no sense because the average life span today of a marketing director is around 18 months or less. So that person will be gone soon and the new person will probably want new creative. So they don’t need a buyout, except perhaps to prevent others from using the images. That is a valid concern in some cases and usually can be alleviated with proper compensation or protecting certain images. But a blanket buyout edict is unfair and will eventually destroy their own options for talent. The ultimate endgame of their strategy will result in thousands of photographers leaving the field, giving clients less creative choice. Then the pendulum of supply and demand may swing back giving photogs some new leverage. One can hope.

Photogs with brand names still can exert some leverage, but that’s diminishing as agencies and creatives have less control and power over their corporate masters who demand cheap. Agencies have lost most of their best revenue streams, so they have to cut costs since most are now public companies and the pressure is immense. This has diminished the role of creative directors also. They are our natural allies in this fight, yet we are a long way from recognizing that.

But there is another group pushing against copyright. The digerati elite. Why do so many people in the tech industry, and the young people who embrace their products, feel that copyright is an anachronism, an irritation, and worse? I guess everyone likes a good deal. These mindbenders, some are good friends of mine, seem to believe the world would be a better place if creators stopped trying to control their work. They think it’s futile to do so anyway since in the digital age it can be taken, so why not join the party and give all your work away? They are pushing for free everything, including software. Notice that many of these people made millions through sale of software in the first place. Notice that they and companies like Microsoft are not advocating giving away their own intellectual property while it’s still a cash cow. All the major software companies have investigators out trying to stop software pirating, just like the music industry. Oh, the hypocrisy.

Many digerati often propose that something like Creative Commons is a good solution and that copyright law goes too far. Libraries are up in arms and want pass the Orphan Works bill. Well, I donate pictures to libraries, students and non-profits and I think most photographers do as well, so that’s not really legitimate. Again, show me a compelling substitution for my ability to license my work, which allows me to feed my family, and I’ll consider it. I work very hard to donate my work and time to give back to my community so that’s not the issue. The basic ability of photographer’s to earn a living is at stake and giving the work away free just means no income.

But the scariest talk to come out of my friends in the digital world is the idea that someday computers will gain consciousness and when they do we’ll just jack in, upload our brains and leave our bodies behind. We’ll all be part of the hive mind. Sharing everything. No need at all for copyright or individual rights. Did these people not see Star Trek? Wasn’t the Borg the enemy? The bad guys? Hello! I was raised by radical left wing parents, but jeez, this is wierd. My hippie/libertarian/free thinking genius friends have anticipated a world that can only be described as a totalitarian fascist nightmare. As Jared Lanier points out in his amazing book “You Are Not A Gadget” in this world, we will all be slaves to the borg, writing free wikipedia entries in our minds all day. There will be no creativity, thus no culture.

In other words, take away copyright and you destroy the individual. The rights of the individual are paramount in an open and free society. Without the individual artist’s right to sell what he or she creates, there will be no artists. So yeah, resistance may be futile, but no copyright=totalitarianism! That’s my new t-shirt.

My message to young photographers: the digital providers and corporate clients do not care about you or your future. Only you can save yourself.

IF no one can think of a new model – aside from say selling iPhone apps and basically NOT doing photography – then why don’t we start a movement to bring back copyright? Why don’t photographers band together to fight for our rights?

This is what the Magnum shooters fought for in the 50’s and the ASMP shooters did in the 70’s and so it’s not a new idea. It’s just that it seems that aside from ASMP and a few aging and vocal veterans, the new generation is oblivious to the dangers. I guess they think they will be the lucky ones, that they are so talented they can rise through the dross to get the few jobs available. After all, this is the generation that got an award just for showing up to soccer practice… The most coddled generation in human history. What can go wrong when they got everything handed to them? Maybe in a few years they will wake up, look in the mirror and say “you want fries with that?”

Ok, sorry! Am I attacking my own son’s generation unfairly? Am I partly responsible? Of course, but I’m also trying to get their attention.

The reaction to my criticism from my young friends, as far as I can tell, is not very practical. They continue low bidding jobs, or thinking that if they upload to Flickr enough someday they’ll be famous and that will somehow bring money. That blogging about whatever and giving their pictures away will make them some kind of expert and they can somehow convert that notoriety into… what… a consulting gig? Advertising on their blog? I’m just not sure what they believe is a sustainable model.

Maybe that’s the point of the new digital reality. There is no one new model. There may be dozens of potential models, and what works for one person won’t necessarily fit another. But I ask again, what is an example of a new model, any new model, that is a viable substitute for licensing? That can generate the kind of income we had before?

This is not only about tradition, principles or money, it’s about saving a culture and a beautiful way of life through photography. It has truly been a gift to have had the ability to do the work I loved and feed my family. I fear for those coming up.

Sunday
16
January 2011

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EFFORTLESS BEAUTY: ALBERT NORMANDIN

Every so often it is a pleasure to share work that I find inspiring such as  Albert Normantin’s elegant photographs of Myanmar. He’s returned 7 times to this hidden country and made a series of images well worth checking out here: http://www.myanmarphotographs.com/

This work exhibits such effortless grace and clarity of vision that you almost don’t notice the rigor with which he shoots. In fact, at first it appears as seriously good travel photography as it pulls you in. As you go through the different portfolios you see winner after winner and the classical composition, perfect lighting combined with subjects that are completely at ease and it all adds up to something much deeper: a master photographer at the top of his game. Albert conveys a profound empathy and respect for his subjects while drawing on traditions of photojournalism and documentary work to capture moments in time. All of this is wrapped up in gorgeous light and color. Lovely to look at. Also his work is a reminder of the importance of learning the basic, classic traditions. Even if we are out to break all those traditions it’s great to know them before we try to break them. Sometimes simple is best. Thanks for the inspiration Albert.

Sunday
19
December 2010

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DAVID BLAINE: THE MAN IS INCREDIBLE

TRAVEL CHANNEL TO AIR  BLAINE’S “BEST YET” ON SUNDAY, DEC. 12th AT 9:00 p.m.

Please check out David’s new special and watch for re-runs, it’s well worth it. Click producer Shelly Ross’s blog link to read more. David Blaine: “A Beautiful Struggle,” an Amazing 1-Hour Special «  shelley ross daily Xpress I’ve seen his work in person and although I spent years as a cynical journalist, I truly cannot believe the amazing things he does. There is no way to describe it other than seeing it and the show does a great job of getting the reality across. Besides the magic, there is his performance art– no other word for the combination of science, daredevil risk-taking and beauty.

Here’s David at the grave of his hero and childhood inspiration, Houdini, deep in Queens, which we shot for the Sundance Channel’s Iconoclasts show:

Magician David Blaine at Houdini's grave. ©2010 Doug Menuez


Sunday
12
December 2010

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BIG FUN, GOOD CAUSE

Charlize Theron auctions Doug Menuez photo to benefit her Africa Outreach Project « Stockland Martel

Charlize Theron + Jane Goodall in the Congo for Iconoclasts ©2010 Doug Menuez

Charlize chose this image for her auction last night for her South African AIDS foundation Africa Outreach Project. If you are interested in owning a signed version of this image we have 2 more 20×24 pigment prints left. Please email Molly in our studio: molly@menuez.com

Tuesday
07
December 2010

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