New port cover_500xI’m very happy to share my latest portfolio update: a mix of new commercial and personal work merged with some of my favorite projects here:  Many thanks to my agents at Stockland Martel for patiently working on this with me. I’ve been so lucky in my career to be able to collaborate on global brand campaigns for A list clients. That work is fun and satisfying because I’m being hired for my eye but also because it funds my personal documentary projects on subjects I care about. (see

The process of creating a portfolio is sometimes gut-wrenching. You end up doing a lot of deep thinking about everything you are doing and why, and probably that’s a good thing. I was reminded recently by a former student of an essay I wrote in 2009 about creating your “fuck you” portfolio; a liberating process to find your true voice by letting go of fear. This is about making a portfolio that shows what you truly, deeply, passionately love to shoot. And want to get paid for. The essay still rings true to me, despite all that has changed for photographers since:


The idea is that if you are trying to make your living solely from your photography you can’t just follow the herd and present what is selling at the moment. Although that will get you started, perhaps, it won’t last as tastes change and ends up crushing your soul. You have to do the hard work to figure out what you see that no one else does.

Once you have refined your eye, you have to build a solid financial foundation and business structure to support your vision, like all entrepreneurs who chase a counterintuitive idea. Imagine a lifetime of satisfying, creative challenges. It can happen but it’s extremely hard, no different from a tech start-up in many ways.

The problem is that if you follow my advice you are more likely to fail. But if you don’t you won’t ever hit it out of the park and live the dream. You just can’t be for everybody, only the best creatives who get what you bring.

I’ve failed hard a few times and find that the path can be a more of a cycle that we end up repeating now and again. I’m still on the journey, learning new things as I face new challenges. But I know from experience that the reward for risking everything and pushing myself to grow is indescribably sweet and worth all the pain.


March 2016

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Farewell, Dick Clark (from Stockland Martel Blog)

Back in 2000, veteran creative director Jeff Griffith asked me to do Dick Clark’s portrait for his Atomic magazine interview. We showed up with my longtime stylist extraordinaire, Juliette Smith, at Mr. Clark’s Santa Monica Boulevard headquarters early one morning and were put in a waiting room so stuffed full of rock & roll  history and memorabilia that we couldn’t speak. Our eyes were bugging out of our heads as we tweaked on one sacred relic after another, the iconography of the religion of rock: an early Chuck Berry guitar; Little Richard’s first 45 rpm of “Long Tall Sally”; signed kit from the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, Otis Redding, you name it. Plus, original jukeboxes stuffed with old records, posters, letters, clothing—just about everything that Dick Clark could gather to tell the story of American music and his own role in helping launch rock & roll through his seminal show American Bandstand. The collection continued down all the halls and throughout the bunker-like offices…

Read full post here >>


April 2012

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Please see our new edit of hands now on Menuez Archive Projects:  Menuez Archive Projects Home I’ve always been obsessed with how hands express so much of a person’s character. Along with the eyes, hands can be almost another form of a portrait. And also ck out Stockland Martel’s blog about this edit here:

Doug Menuez on photographing hands « Stockland Martel

October 2010

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I’m thrilled to announce that Stephanie Menuez has joined Menuez Archive Projects as Director of New Business & Marketing. Many of you know her from her 13-year career as a top rep in San Francisco, though I knew of her long before that—she’s my sister. Here’s a shot of us my dad took when we were like 3:

©D. Barry Menuez

Steph has had her own amazing career off broadway in the 80’s and then in Hollywood in movies, got tired of that and we started working together in the mid-90’s as I was entering a new phase in my career. She has an incredible eye and is now a painter. Her intuitive way of working with people and generous spirit has been such a strong part of my work in the past. We’ve not worked together for the past five years so it’s a great reunion!

In her new role, Stephanie will serve as our client’s guide to unlocking the creative potential of MAP’s vast archives of exclusive stock imagery by doing custom searches. And she’ll will work closely with our superagents at Stockland Martel to support their sales efforts on our behalf. She’s also looking forward to hearing about what you’re working on. In fact, if you’re in New York and want to meet up for lunch, give Stephanie a call (212.336.1561) or email her (

Stephanie Menuez joins Menuez Archive Projects as Director of New Business & Marketing « Stockland Martel

July 2010

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The big news at Menuez Archive Projects this week is the announcement that Stockland Martel is now our exclusive sales agent in the US and worldwide (apart from Europe– stay tuned for more Euro news soon). They have just sent out the below email blast and we are extremely proud to formalize this arrangement. This deepens our already fruitful relationship as they represent me for assignment work as well. And our clients all know they can expect t us to leap through flaming hoops for them…

If you were at our February launch party or read about us on the blogs, you know our mission is to put the million-plus images from my archive at the fingertips of creatives everywhere. So we’re proud to report that in three short months, we’ve already expanded our inventory well into the thousands, refined our beta site and have thousands more being edited and scanned every month. But now I also understand why more photographers don’t go through this process– it’s seriously difficult and seriously expensive!  But we’ve got a great start and it’s a huge relief to be underway.

May 2010

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